1. Some snapshots of Anna & Froga: I Dunno… What Do You Want To Do?, a great book by Anouk Ricard (publishers Drawn & Quarterly) and our Cool New Book of the week. This is the second volume of Ricard’s Anna & Froga, and features more of the vibrant illustrations, charming storytelling, and wacky characters that Ricard’s fans have come to love. A surefire hit for readers of all ages.

    Check out more of Ricard’s work on her blog, and buy the book on D+Q’s website, or on the world wide web.

    1 year ago  /  9 notes

  2. Some excerpts from New School, the exciting new book from next-generation cartoonist Dash Shaw. Known for his forward-thinking and experimental approaches to cartoonist, Shaw’s previous books Bodyworld and Bottomless Belly Button have eschewed conventions and garnered widespread acclaim.

    The story of a naive young man’s excursions into a bizarre amusement park, in search of his missing brother, New School is an ever-shifting, multi-layered work of innovative cartooning, and an excellent addition to Shaw’s already impressive bibliography.

    You can purchase New School and read an 18 page excerpt over at the Fantagraphics website.

    1 year ago  /  67 notes

  3. Rutu Modan’s new book, The Property, (our Cool New Book of the week) was recently released by Drawn & Quarterly. Like her Eisner-winning 2008 graphic novel, Exit WoundsThe Property  fuses socio-political commentary with poignant character studies, sincerely and thoroughly examining the minutiae of human relationships. 

    In The Propety, Modan uses the story of an Israeli young woman and her grandmother venturing to Poland in search of a family property as a lens through which to examine the role of family, the precipitous, fragile nature of romantic involvement, and the personal difficulty of reconciling the present with the past. Driven by Modan’s nimble storytelling and deft, visual economy, The Property is an immensely readable and profoundly rewarding comic.

    You can buy The Property, along with Rutu’s other books, on Drawn & Quarterly’s website. Check out some more of her work here.

    1 year ago  /  6 notes

  4. Some snapshots ofQuodlibet, one of the exciting new books out from Nobrow. In this beautifully crafted volume, illustrator Katja Spitzer and writer Sebastien Gievert have joined forces to anthologize the various incarnations and appearances of the letter Q, effectively creating an encyclopedic volume for a letter they felt had not garnered it’s deserved attention. Printed in 3 colors, Spitzer’s sumptuous illustrations combine fluidly with Gievert’s journalistic contributions, creating a wonderful volume both informative and steeped in artistry.

    You can buy Quodlibet from Nobrow’s website. Check out Katja’s other incredible illustration work on her website.

    1 year ago  /  14 notes

  5. Some snapshots and excerpts from Tom Gauld’s new book, You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack, an anthology of his hilarious, whip-smart comic strip series of the same name.

    Read the rest of Gauld’s strips here, and buy the book here.

    1 year ago  /  12 notes

  6. Some snapshots of the most recent Nobrow collection, Nobrow 8: Hysteria. 128 full color pages with contributions from 45 super talented artists, including Luke Pearson, Dustin Harbin, Andrea Kalfas, and many others.

    1 year ago  /  74 notes

  7. Some snapshots of Eric Lambé’s beautiful new book, The King’s Son, (acquired at TCAF). A stunning, wordless epic, executed in ballpoint pen.

    Find more of Eric’s incredible work here and here

    1 year ago  /  10 notes

  8. Some snapshots of Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong, the new book from Prudence Shen & Faith Erin Hicks. Fresh off the presses, Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong is a high octane, borderline sci-fi story of high school rivalries and popularity wars. Prudence Shen’s writing is a treat to read, and is wonderfully matched with Hicks’ cartooning, which calls to mind a hybridization of Bryan Lee O’Malley and Nate Powell. Just out from First Second, Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong is definitely a book to pick up.

    You can purchase Nothing here. Check out Shen and Hicks on their respective websites.

    1 year ago  /  21 notes

  9. Our Cool New Book this week is Miriam Katin’s Letting it Go. Having picked up cartooning late in life, (at the age of sixty-three), Katin is already a veritable master of the form. Her second book, Letting it Go, is beautifully executed ,with free-flowing page layouts and colored pencil drawings both gestural and vibrant. Letting it Go tells the autobiographical story of Katin’s struggle, as a Holocaust survivor, with residual feelings of hatred and resentment towards Germany and its people, rekindled when her son announces his move to Berlin. As she travels to Berlin with her son, she must reconcile both with him, Berlin, and most importantly, herself. A book marked by fearless storytelling, masterful drawing and weighty yet accessible catharsis, Letting it Go represents a strong and virtuosic work from an exciting cartoonist.

    You can purchase Letting it Go, as well as Katin’s previous book We Are on Our Own, from Drawn and Quarterly’s website. Check out some of her other work on her website

    1 year ago  /  26 notes

  10. So it’s a day late, but our Cool New Book is worth the wait: Marble Season, Gilbert Hernandez’s new graphic novel. Hernandez, best known for his long-running series Love and Rockets, which he created with his brothers Jaime and Mario, has recently moved from serialized stories to shorter, self-contained work. Marble Season is the latest of these, a semi-autobiographical love letter to comics, loosely based around Gilbert’s upbringing in Southern California, in a Mexican-American family. Understated, funny, and resonant, Marble Season is a great addition to Gilbert’s already impressive catalogue, and any comics readers’ library.

    1 year ago  /  10 notes

  11. Gary Baseman poster, soda can, and toys, hanging out around the New Yorker offices.

    1 year ago  /  11 notes

  12. Our Cool New Book this week is The Door is Always Open, a collected retrospective of the work of Gary Baseman. Cataloguing an exhibition curated by the Skirball Cultural CenterThe Door is Always Open provides a comprehensive introduction to Baseman’s work. Influenced by pre-war cartoon imagery, pop art, toy culture, Americana and cultural mythology at large, Baseman’s work is weird, subversive, and compelling, epitomizing the aesthetics and sensibilities of pop surrealism.

    You can purchase the book here, and check out Gary Baseman on his website.

    1 year ago  /  13 notes

  13. So this Wednesday, in lieu of a New Book, we’ve got something a little different: the cartoons of Zohar Lazar. Tackling touchy subjects like racial profiling, homelessness, and wealth distribution (à la Occupy movement), Lazar’s cartoons are ruthlessly contemporary, marked by a biting, flippant wit. It also doesn’t hurt that he’s a tremendous cartoonist, with beautiful ink washes and purposeful brush lines inspired by New Yorker legends like Peter Arno.
You can check out Zohar’s great new cartoons on his tumblr (watch out, some are a little racy, some are provocative, but none are gratuitous. That’s what we appreciate: thought-provoking cartoons.) And if YOU have ideas, send them to our OPEN CALL.

    So this Wednesday, in lieu of a New Book, we’ve got something a little different: the cartoons of Zohar Lazar. Tackling touchy subjects like racial profiling, homelessness, and wealth distribution (à la Occupy movement), Lazar’s cartoons are ruthlessly contemporary, marked by a biting, flippant wit. It also doesn’t hurt that he’s a tremendous cartoonist, with beautiful ink washes and purposeful brush lines inspired by New Yorker legends like Peter Arno.

    You can check out Zohar’s great new cartoons on his tumblr (watch out, some are a little racy, some are provocative, but none are gratuitous. That’s what we appreciate: thought-provoking cartoons.) And if YOU have ideas, send them to our OPEN CALL.

    1 year ago  /  35 notes

  14. in 1996—so quite a while back—R Sikoryak, a fine cartoonist and New Yorker cover artist welcomes the internet age in Peter Arno style. Now, Arno comes back again in Zohar Lazar’s Tumblr.

    1 year ago  /  35 notes

  15. A sharp cartoon from Zohar Lazar, very much on target. Racial profiling is alive and well in NYC.

    A sharp cartoon from Zohar Lazar, very much on target. Racial profiling is alive and well in NYC.

    1 year ago  /  35 notes